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Spitfire 30 Gallon Slipper Tank

Eduard BRASSIN , 1/48 scale


S u m m a r y :

Catalogue Number

Eduard BRASSIN Item No. 648 133 - Spitfire 30 Gallon Slipper Tank

Contents and media

One grey resin part, one small photo-etched fret, fold-out instruction sheets

Scale

1/48

Price:

USD $9.95 plus shipping available online from Eduard’s website

USD $7.96 plus shipping available online at Squadron

GBP £5.60 plus shipping available online from Hannants

and specialist hobby retailers worldwide

Review Type

First Look

Advantages:

Well produced and finely detailed.

Disadvantages:

None noted.

Conclusion:

Beautifully mastered and cast, this tank is a welcome addition to Eduard’s range of 1/48 Brassin Spitfire accessories.


Reviewed by Brad Fallen


Eduard's 1/48 scale Spitfire 30 Gal Slipper Tank is available online from Squadron.com

 

Background

 

Like the Bf 109, the Spitfire was designed as a short-range fighter.  Duration was not a priority until – with the Battle of Britain won – the RAF needed to send its Spitfires further afield over occupied Europe, North Africa and, most critically, to relieve Malta.  The resulting trial-and-error developments are well covered by Alfred Price in his excellent book ‘Spitfire in Combat’, culminating in the successful use of 90-gallon slipper tanks on flights to Malta.  With the concept proven, slipper tanks were produced in a variety of sizes including 30, 45 and 170 gallons and saw widespread use.

 

 

FirstLook

 

Eduard has already released two Spitfire tanks in its 1/48 Brassin range:  a 90-gallon slipper tank that was first included in the Mk.IX Royal Class boxing and then released as a stand-alone set, and a later style cylindrical 90-gallon tank.  Now a 30-gallon slipper tank has been added to the range.

 

  • Eduard BRASSIN Item No. 648 133 - Spitfire 30 Gallon Slipper Tank Review by Brad Fallen: Image
  • Eduard BRASSIN Item No. 648 133 - Spitfire 30 Gallon Slipper Tank Review by Brad Fallen: Image
  • Eduard BRASSIN Item No. 648 133 - Spitfire 30 Gallon Slipper Tank Review by Brad Fallen: Image
  • Eduard BRASSIN Item No. 648 133 - Spitfire 30 Gallon Slipper Tank Review by Brad Fallen: Image
  • Eduard BRASSIN Item No. 648 133 - Spitfire 30 Gallon Slipper Tank Review by Brad Fallen: Image
  • Eduard BRASSIN Item No. 648 133 - Spitfire 30 Gallon Slipper Tank Review by Brad Fallen: Image
  • Eduard BRASSIN Item No. 648 133 - Spitfire 30 Gallon Slipper Tank Review by Brad Fallen: Image
  • Eduard BRASSIN Item No. 648 133 - Spitfire 30 Gallon Slipper Tank Review by Brad Fallen: Image
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This is one of Eduard’s simplest Brassin sets:  a single resin part and two photo-etched brass parts.  The resin tank in the review sample has been beautifully mastered and cast, with both sides of the tank featuring convincing structural detail and an impression of slightly stressed metal.  The upper surface detail will be lost when the tank is attached to a model, but has presumably been included if you want to use the tank as part of a diorama.  I’ve got several photos that show large numbers of 30-gallon tanks stacked against each other on airfields, which would make an interesting if somewhat expensive diorama scene!

The photo-etched parts represent tank mounting points and will require careful folding.  This will be fiddly because the parts are quite small, but fortunately Eduard has included a couple of spares to cover any mistakes.

 

 

The small-fold out instruction sheet shows clearly where the tank should be mounted, and the accompanying, very slight modification that is required to the single piece lower wing of Eduard’s Mk. IX kits.  The tank has been designed for the Eduard Mk.VIII/IX/XVI family, and while it can also be used other manufacturers’ kits the tank’s curves may mean some fettling is required for a good fit.

 

 

Conclusion

 

This is a welcome addition to Eduard’s range of Brassin Spitfire accessories.  The 30-gallon tank was widely used in the final years of World War II and – to me at least – is aesthetically more pleasing than the more bulbous 90-gallon tank.  Highly recommended.

Thanks to Eduard for the samples and images.


Review Text Copyright 2015 by Brad Fallen
Page Created 4 December, 2015
Last updated 4 December, 2015

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